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International Amateur Radio Union Region 1
                        - IARU
I.A.R.U.















"AMATEUR RADIO - THE GREATEST OF ALL SCIENTIFIC HOBBIES" I.A.R.U

INFORMATION

INTERFERENCE From "BT HOME PLUG" & other 'P.L.T.' devices Coming YOUR WAY SOON ? : More >>


ABBREVIATIONS: See Below >

AMATEUR RADIO BANDS:  See Below >

ANTENNA WIRE TRIMMING CHART:  See Below>

CALLING CQSee Below>

CALL SIGN ALLOCATIONS:  See Below >

CAPACITORS
& RESISTORS : See This Page >

COAXIAL CABLE LOSSES COMPARED:  See Below >

DX CODE OF CONDUCT:  See Below>

DECIBELS: See Below >

ETIQUETTE and GOOD OPERATING PROCEDURES:  See Below >

INTERNATIONAL Q CODES: See Below >

IARU - International Amateur Radio Union:  See Below >

ITU Regions and Zones -  W.A.B. Map:
  See Below >


KENWOOD TS-590S Resources, Information and Links: See Below >

MODES or TYPES OF TRANSMISSION / EMISSION:  See Below >

MORSE CODE:  See Below >

NDBs
- List of Non Directional Beacons in UK by antenna guru Steve Nichols G0KYA (most now closed down)

OPERATING ABROAD / FOREIGN COUNTRIES / CYPRUS:
  See This Page >

PHONETIC ALPHABET: See Below >

RESISTORS & CAPACITORS: See Below >

SIGNAL METERS & CALIBRATION:  See Below >

SIGNAL REPORTS Using RST:
See Below >

SWR LOSS CHART:  See Below >

TOROID DIMENSIONS - typical physical dimensions of iron poweder toroidal cores: See Below >

UK PREFIX MAP:
 See Below >

WIRE - STANDARD WIRE GAUGES vs DIAMETERSee Below >

WIRE - AMERICAN WIRE GAUGES converted to DIAMETER:  See Below >

WINDOWS ALT Codes and CTRL Key combinations:   See Below >

WINDOWS 10 and AMATEUR RADIO:    Read More Here >

LINKS TO MUCH MORE INFORMATION:  Here >




GENERAL INFORMATION
.

Amateur Radio Bands

2100 m

137 kHz

135.7 137.8 kHz

160m

1.8 MHz

1.810 2.000 MHz

80 m

3.5 MHz

3.500 3.800 MHz

40 m

7.0 MHz

7.000 7.200 MHz

30 m

10 MHz

10.100 10.150 MHz

20 m

14 MHz

14.000 14.350 MHz

17 m

18 MHz

18.068 18.168 MHz

15 m

21 MHz

21.000 21.450 MHz

12 m

24 MHz

24.890 24.990 MHz

10 m

28 MHz

28.000 29.700 MHz

6 m

50 MHz

50.000 52.000 MHz

4 m

70 MHz

70.000 70.500 MHz

2 m

144 MHz

144.00 146.00 MHz

70 cms

430 MHz

430.00 440.00 MHz

23 cms

1.3 GHz

1,240.00 1,325.00 MHz

13 cms

2.3 GHz

2,130.00 2,450.00 MHz

9 cms

3.4 GHz

3,400.00 3,475.00 MHz

6 cms

5.7 GHz

5,650.00 5,850.00 MHz

3 cms

10 GHz

10,000.00 10,500.00 MHz

12 mm

24 GHz

24,000.00 24,250.00 MHz

6 mm

47 GHz

47,000.00 47,090.00 MHz

4 mm

76 GHz

75,500.00 81,000.00 MHz






SIGNAL REPORTS

RST is:

R: Readability - A rating of how well what is being said is understood. The readability of a signal is given on a scale of 1 to 5; "5" being perfectly understandable with no difficulty - reported as "Radio 5". A rating of 1 means that the signal is completely un-readable.

S: Signal Strength - A rating of how strong a received signal is. The "S" rating is given on a scale of 1 to 9. A rating of "Signal 1" indicates an extremely faint signal while a rating of "Signal 9" is an extremely strong signal.

T: Tone - This is used for Morse Code, the "T" rating being used to give an indication of the tonal quality of the Morse Code signals. T1 would indicated an extremely rough tone and T9 a pure tone.

When dealing with phone transmissions the R and S parts of the RST code are used. "Five and Nine" indicates that the transmission is perfectly understandable with extremely strong signals. A report of "4 and 5" would mean quite easy to understand with fairly good signal strength.

Even having explained all this, there are some CB operators will give everyone a "5 and 9" report, even if the signal being received is weak and difficult to understand! - I don't know why this is.

R = READABILITY ("Radio"):
R 1 Unreadable
R 2 Barely readable, some words occasionally distinguishable
R 3 Readable, but with considerable difficulty
R 4 Readable with practically no difficulty
R 5 Perfectly readable

S = SIGNAL STRENGTH ("Signal"):
S 1 Faint signal, barely perceptible
S 2 Very weak signal
S 3 Weak signal
S 4 Fair signal
S 5 Fairly good signal
S 6 Good signal
S 7 Moderately strong signal
S 8 Strong signal
S 9 Extremely strong signal

T = CW TONE
T 1 50 / 60 hertz a.c., very rough & broad
T 2 Very rough a.c., harsh & broad
T 3 Rough a.c. tone, rectified but not filtered
T 4 Rough note, some trace of filtering
T 5 Filtered rectified a.c. but strongly ripple-modulated
T 6 Filtered tone, definite trace of ripple modulation
T 7 Near pure tone, trace of ripple modulation
T 8 Near perfect tone, slight trace of modulation
T 9 Pure Tone, no trace of ripple or modulation of any kind








































PHONETIC ALPHABET

THE PHONETIC ALPHABET
A ALPHA N NOVEMBER
B BRAVO O OSCAR
C CHARLIE P PAPA
D DELTA Q QUEBEC
E ECHO R ROMEO
F FOXTROT S SIERRA
G GOLF T TANGO
H HOTEL U UNIFORM
I INDIA V VICTOR
J JULIET W WHISKEY
K KILO X X-RAY
L LIMA Y YANKEE
M MIKE Z ZULU





INTERNATIONAL Q CODES

Q Code Question Answer
QRA What station are you? My station is...
QRB How far are you from my station? My distance is...
QRD Where are you going, where are you from? I am going to....from....
QRE What is your ETA? My ETA is.....
QRF Are you returning? I am returning.
QRG What is my frequency? Your frequency is.....
QRH Does my frequency vary? Your frequency varies.
QRJ Are my signals bad / weak? Your signals are weak.
QRK How do you read my signals? Your signals are...
QRL Are you busy? I am busy. Please don't interfere.
QRM Are you experiencing interference? I am experiencing interference.
QRN Are you troubled with atmospheric noise? I am experiencing atmospheric noise.
QRO Shall I increase power? Increase power.
QRP Shall I decrease power? Decrease power.
QRQ Shall I transmit faster? (morse) Transmit faster.
QRS Shall I transmit more slowly? Transmit slower.
QRT Shall I stop transmitting? Stop transmitting.
QRU Anything for me? Nothing for you.
QRV Are you ready? I am ready.
QRX Shall I wait? Will you call again? Wait. I will call you at....(time).
QRY Is it my turn? It is your turn.
QRZ Who is calling me? You are called by....
QSA What is the strength of my signal? Your signal is... (1- 5)
QSB Do my signals fade? Your signals fade.
QSK Can you hear me between your signals? Can I break in? I can hear you between my transmissions. Break in.
QSL Please acknowledge receipt. I acknowledge receipt.
QSM Shall I repeat my last message? Repeat your last message.
QSN Did you hear me on channel...? I heard you on channel....
QSO Can you contact? I can contact.
QSP Will you relay to..? I will relay to...
QSW Do you wish to transmit on this channel? I wish to transmit on this channel.
QSY Shall I change to channel..? Change to channel...
QSZ Shall I transmit each word or sentence twice? Transmit each word or sentence twice.
QTE What is my bearing from you? Your bearing is....
QTH What is your position? My position is...
QTI What is your course? My course is....
QTJ What is your speed? My speed is........
QTL What is your heading? My heading is.....
QTN What is your departure time? My departure time is....
QTR What is the correct time? The correct time is...
QUA Have you heard news of...? I have news of...
QUD Have you received the emergency signal sent by...? I have received the emergency signal sent by...
QUF Have you received the distress signal sent by....? I have received the distress signal sent by...
QUM Is the emergency traffic ended? The emergency traffic is ended.
QUO Shall I search for....? Please search for...
QUR Have survivors been picked up? Survivors have been picked up.
QUS Have you sighted survivors or wreckage? I have sighted survivors or wreckage.
QUT Is the position marked? The position is marked.





AMATEUR RADIO CALL SIGN ALLOCATIONS

Amateur Radio Call-sign Allocations (as at 2008)

Foundation Licence call signs: 

M3 + 3 Letters
M6 + 3 Letters


Intermediate Licence call signs:

2E0 + 3 letters
2E1 + 3 letters


Full Licence call signs:

G1 + 3 letters
G2 + 2 letters
G2 + 3 letters
G3 + 2 letters
G3 + 3 letters
G4 + 2 letters
G4 + 3 letters
G5 + 2 letters
G6 + 2 letters
G6 + 3 letters
G7 + 3 letters
G8 + 2 letters
G8 + 3 letters
G0 + 3 letters
M0 + 3 letters
M1 + 3 letters
M5 + 3 letters




UK PREFIX MAP

UK Prefix Map
UK Prefix Map

D = Isle Of Man
E = England
I = Northern Ireland
J = Jersey
M = Scotland
U = Guernsey
W = Wales
EI = Eire / Republic of Ireland



Use of UK Prefixes:

A full licence holder in Scotland would use the M prefix in this this way: GM3xxx or MMxxx for example. A station in Wales would be GW8xxx or MWxxx.

If a station licensed in England had a callsign on Gxxx or Mxxx and operated on a portable, mobile or alternative address basis in Wales then the call sign, as used in England, would have to be modified when operating in Wales to GWxxx or MWxxx etc adding /P, /M or /A as appropriate in the usual way.

Foundation call signs, M3 and M6 work in the same way. Intermediate licenses work slightly differently. So: 2Exxx when in England, 2Wxxx when in Wales, 2Mxxx  when in Scotland, 2Uxxx when in Guernsey etc.


It is obviously important to realize exactly where one is when operating away from the home QTH and remember to modify one's call sign accordingly when crossing a border.


Amateur Radio Suffixes:

/P = Portable (temporary location)
/M = Mobile (from a vehicle, vessel on inland waterway or pedestrian)
/A = Alternative address (i.e. not the main station address - e.g. a friend's house etc)
/M = Maritime mobile (from a vessel at sea, on the seaward side of the UK's low water line or
          international waters -  /MM operation is permitted to full licence holders only)







I.A.R.U.  -  International Amateur Radio Union

Links to your I.A.R.U. in your region:

1  - IARU Region 1: Europe, Africa, Middle East and Northern Asia

2  - IARU Region 2: The Americas

3  - IARU Region 3: Asia-Pacific





I.T.U.  REGIONS  -  International Telecommunications Union worldwide Regions

ITU Region Map



I.T.U. ZONES and REGIONS

I.T.U. Zones and Regions
Click here to go directly to the website of the above I.T.U.  I.A.R.U. Zones & Regions Map


WORLDWIDE GRID SQUARE MAP

World Grid Square Map
Click here to go directly to website of above Grid Square Map


EUROPEAN GRID SQUARE MAP

European Grid Locator by PA2HJS
Click here to go directly to PA2HJS grid square map


WORLDSIDE CQ ZONE MAP

Worldwide CQ Zone Map
Click here to go directly to the website of the above CQ Zone Map


Links to more Grid Square Maps; CQ Zones and Call Sign Maps can be found here >



WAB Squares Map
WAB Squares Map
Finding Your WAB Locator and IARU Grid Square Locator:
To find your WAB Locator you can go to www.streetmap.co.uk, enter your postcode or street name. The map should show your location, if not there is a function to move across so that it points to your QTH. Then look at the bottom of the map and find the words "Click here to convert coordinates". The page that pops up will give the OS X and Y coordinates, Postcode, Latitude and Longitude together with the Land Ranger National Grid Reference expressed as, for example, LR  SK113002.  Your WAB Locator will be made up of the first two letter and the first and fourth numbers of this grid reference. e.g. SK113002 so in this case SK10 would be the WAB (Worked All Britain) locator. Visit the Worked All Britain website here: http://wab.intermip.net

The Land Ranger National Grid Reference found above can also be used to find your I.R.A.U. Grid Square Locator by entering the grid reference into the Practical Wireless magazine website at http://www.pwcontest.org.uk/NGR2Loc.html  or the IARU function of RSGB website (members area) here: http://www.rsgb.org/membersonly/index.htm

Using these functions with the above example National Grid Reference, will produce the IARU Locator of IO92CO.

Alternatively F6FVY has helpfully produced this Google Maps function that will identify your IARU Locator by simply clicking on your QTH location on the map. See this website here:  http://f6fvy.free.fr/qthLocator/fullScreen.php

See also the Amsat Grid Square Conversions here:  http://www.amsat.org/amsat/toys/gridconv.html





ABBREVIATIONS



Some Common Amateur Radio Abbreviations
AM
BCI
CQ 
DX
FM
LSB
RF
RX
Amplitude Modulation
Broadcast Interference
Attention all stations
Long distance reception
Frequency Modulation
Lower Side Band
RF - Radio Frequency
RX  -  Receiver / Receive
SSB
SWR
TVI
USB
VOX 
XYL
YL
73
Single Side Band
Standing Wave Ratio
Television Interference
Upper Side Band
Voice Operated Transmitter
Wife
Young Lady
Best wishes / Best regards



More Amateur Radio Abbreviations
ABT
ADR
AGN
ANT
BC
BCI
BCL
BCNU
BD
BFO
BK
BUG
CANS
CC
CK
CLD
CNT
CO
CONDX
COSER
CRD
CUD
CUAGN
CUL
CW
DF
DR
DX
ES
FB
FER
FREQ
GA
GB
GM
GN
GND
GUD
HAM
HI
HPE
HR
HRD
HVY
HW
II
LSN
MNI
about
address
again
antenna
broadcast
broadcast interference
broadcast listener
be seeing you
bad
beat frequency oscillator
break in
semi automatic key
headphones
crystal control
check
called
cannot
crystal oscillator
conditions
counterpoise
card
could
see you again
see you later
continuous wave
direction finder
dear
distance
and
fine business
for
frequency
good afternoon
goodbye
good morning
good night
ground
good
amateur
laughter
hope
hear (or here)
heard
heavy
how
repeat
listen
many
MOD
MSG
MTR
NR
OB
OC
OM
OP
OT
PSE
PWR
RCVR
RPT
RPRT
RX
SED
SIG
SKED
SN
SRI
SUM
SW
SWL
TFC
TKS
TMW
TNX
TRX
TVI
TX
U
UR
VY
W
WID
WKD
WKG
WL
WUD
WX
XMTR
XYL
XTAL
YF
YL
73
88
modulation
message
metre
number
old boy
old chap
old man
operator
old timer
please
power
receiver
repeat
report
receiver
signal
signal
schedule
soon
sorry
some
shortwave
short wave listener
traffic
thanks
tomorrow
thanks
transciever
television interference
transmitter
you
you are
very
watts
with
worked
working
will
would
weather
transmitter
wife
crystal
wife
young lady
good wishes
love and kisses

Information compiled by M0MTJ





MORSE CODE
CW / Morse Code table
CW / Morse Code table





SIGNAL METERS

"S" Reading
Received voltage using
6 dB "S" point spacing
Received voltage using
5 dB "S" point spacing
Received voltage using
4 dB "S" point spacing
Received voltage using
3 dB "S" point spacing
S1
0.2 V 0.5 V 1.26 V 3.1 V
S2
0.4 V 0.89 V
1.99 V 4.4 V
S3
0.8 V 1.58 V 3.15 V 6.3 V
S4
1.6 V 2.81 V 5.0 V 8.9 V
S5
3.2 V 5.0 V 7.92 V 12.5 V
S6
6.2 V 8.89 V 12.6 V 17.7 V
S7
12.5V 15.8 V 19.9 V 25.0 V
S8
25 V 28.1 V 31.5 V 35.4 V
S9
50 V 50 V
50 V
50 V
S9 +10
158 V 158 V
158 V
158 V
S9 +20
500 V 500 V
500 V
500 V
S9 +30
1581 V
1581 V
1581 V
1581 V
S9 +40
5000 V (i.e. 5 mV)
5 mV
5 mV
5 mV
S9 +50
15.81 mV
15.81 mV
15.81 mV
15.81 mV
S9 +60
50 mV
50 mV
50 mV
50 mV
Information calculated & compiled by M0MTJ


It is often accepted that the "S9" point represents a received signal of 50V (microvolts), although some equipment may specify that S9 should be calibrated at 100V which muddies the water a little.

Convention often states that each "S" point below S9 this represents a gradation of 6dB (decibels), though this is a contentious statement as some would argue that gradations of 5 dB or 4 dB might be more typical in 'real world' S meters. S meters cannot therefore be wholly relied upon for laboratory standard accuracy and in reality merely provide comparative values.

Above is a table that shows what the actual received voltage would be on a perfectly calibrated Signal Meter using with S9 representing 50uV and the often accepted 6 dB per "S" unit calibration and comparing this with the 5dB and 4dB per "S" unit calibration. While these are not laboratory grade specifications it can be helpful to use a table such as this to provide an idea of the RF voltages being received.

As a very rough rule of thumb a receiver may require about 0.5 uV (microvolts) of RF input to produce a signal to noise ratio (S/N) of around of 20 dB.

+ 3dB  =  2 x the power or 1.4 times the voltage - about 1/2 an "S" point
+ 6dB  =  4 x the power or 2 x the voltage or approximately 1 "S" point
+ 9dB  =  8 x the power or 3 x the voltage
+10dB = 10 x the power or 3.162 x the voltage or approximately 1.5 "S" points
+20dB = 100 x the power or 10 x the voltage or approximately 3 "S" points





DECIBELS:

The decibel is not a measure of a particular electrical unit and therefore figures that are expressed as a decibel are completely meaningless unless they are related to a particular reference. A decibel is actually one tenth of a Bel and is derived from the logarithmic ratio of two voltages or current or power levels: One of these levels must be measured to act as the reference point in order that the other level (or levels) can be expressed as dB relative to that point.

So; Decibels (dBs) represent a RATIO of one voltage to another, or one power to another at the same impedance. Decibels can be either a positive figure representing gain or a negative figure representing a loss.

dBW = 10 x log of Watts

Watts =  antilog of (dBW 10)

dBV = 20 x log of Volts

Volts = antilog of (dBV 20)


Here is a table of decibel relationships:

Voltage Loss Power Loss dB Voltage Gain Power Gain
1.000 1.000 0 1.000 1.000
0.981 0.977 0.1 1.012 1.023
0.977 0.955 0.2 1.023 1.047
0.966 0.933 0.3 1.035 1.072
0.955 0.912 0.4 1.047 1.096
0.944 0.891 0.5 1.059 1.122
0.933 0.871 0.6 1.072 1.148
0.912 0.832 0.8 1.096 1.202
0.891 0.794 1.0 1.122 1.259


1

0.794 0.631 2.0 1.259 1.585
0.708 0.501 3.0 1.413 1.995
0.631 0.398 4.0 1.585 2.512
0.562 0.316 5.0 1.778 3.162
0.501 0.251 6.0 1.995 3.981
0.447 0.200 7.0 2.239 5.012
0.398 0.159 8.0 2.512 6.310
0.355 0.126 9.0 2.818 7.943
0.316 0.100 10.0 3.162 10


1

0.200 0.0398 14.0 5.01 25.1
0.178
0.0316
15.0
5.62
31.6
0.100 0.0100 20.0 10 100
0.7079
0.001
30.0
31.62
1000
0.01
0.0001
40.0
100.0
10000

Information compiled by M0MTJ


dBs are added to represent the total gain or the total loss, while the gain or losses that are expressed as fractions must be multiplied.

e.g. a power gain of 2.5 dB is dealt with thus: 2.0 dB plus 0.5 dB i.e. 1.585 X 1.122 =  1.778


Examples:

+ 3dB  =  2 x the power (or twice the loss, for example when dealing with feeder losses) or 1.4 times the voltage
+ 6dB  =  4 x the power or 2 x the voltage or approximately 1 "S" point
+ 9dB  =  8 x the power or 3 x the voltage
+10dB = 10 x the power or 3.162 x the voltage or just over 1.5 "S" points
+20dB = 100 x the power or 10 x the voltage or just over 3 "S" points

Transmitter Power

Transmitter power is often expressed in Watts, but in amateur radio it is common to find transmitter power expressed in dBW. This is the power in decibels relative to one Watt.

e.g. if a transmitter is quoted as having an output of 6dBW then that would be the same as saying that the power is 4 watts. If a transmitter is quoted as having a power of 14 dBW the 10dBW figure (i.e. 10 watts) is multiplied by the 4dBW figure (i.e. 2.5 watts):  10W x 2.5 =  25 Watts.

Here is a table showing the conversion between dBW and Watts:

dBW Power in Watts
dBW Power in Watts
0 1
16 40
1 1.25
17 50
2 1.6
18 63
3 2.0
19 79
4 2.5
20 100
5 3.2
21 126
6 4
22 158
7 5
23 200
8 6.3
24 251
9 8
25 316
10 10
26 398
11 13
27 501
12 16
28 631
13 20
29 794
14 25
30 1,000
15 32
40 10,000




VSWR

Chart Showing Percentage of Forward and Reflected Power at Various VSWR's:
 

VSWR Forward Power
%
Reflected Power
%
1.5 : 1 96 4
2 :1 89 11
2.5 : 1 82 18
3 : 1 75 25
3.5 : 1 70 30
4 : 1 64 36
4.5 : 1 60 40
5 : 1 56 44
6 : 1 50 50
7 : 1 44 56
8 : 1 40 60
9 : 1 36 64
10 : 1 33 67






COAXIAL & OTHER FEEDER CABLE LOSSES COMPARED

When using an antenna at its resonant frequency  the VSWR should be very low and losses at HF should also be very small. However when it is anticipated that an HF antenna will be used for wideband, non resonant, operation (e.g. a popular all band 'Doublet') the VSWR could be significantly higher and losses in coaxial cable will be higher  than with a resonant aerial.

e.g. at 28 MHz when using an antenna with an SWR of 9:1 it may be perfectly possible to match the antenna system to the transmitter using an Antenna Matching Unit ("ATU"), but if using a 20 metre length of RG58 coaxial cable the losses could be around 3 dB - in which case 100 watts of transmitter power would only result at 50 watts reaching the antenna terminals.

Alternatively if Twin Feeder is used to feed an antenna such as an All Band Doublet where high VSWR will be expected the loss at an SWR of 9:1 would only be about 0.3 dB which would equate to over 90 watts reaching the antenna terminals!

Below are four tables that compare feeder losses at various frequencies with SWR's of 1:1, 3:1, 6:1 and 9:1.


( * = approx)
With an SWR of 1:1 at antenna
 Losses in dB per 100 metres at various frequencies
Cable Type: 3.5 MHz 10 MHz 30 MHz 50 MHz 144 MHz 432 MHz
RG174 *
5
10
15
21
33
59
RG58 2.5 4.3 7.7 10 17 32
RG8 Mini / RG8-X 1.7 2.9 5.4 7.1 13.2 26.5
RG8 1.06 1.8 3.2 4.2 7.6 9.1
RG213 1.1 2.0 3.5 4.7 8.4 15
Ecoflex 10
1.2
2.8 4.9 8.9
Westflex 103 0.6 0.9 1.7 2.7 4.5 7.5
450 Ohm Twin 0.17 0.29 0.51 0.67





With an SWR of 3:1 at the antenna
 Losses in dB per 100 metres at various frequencies
Cable Type: 3.5 MHz 10 MHz 30 MHz 50 MHz 144 MHz 432 MHz
RG58 3.4 5.5 8.9 11.3 19.1 34.3
RG8 Mini / RG8-X 2.4 3.9 6.6 8.4 14.5 27.7
RG8 1.6 2.6 4.2 5.4 8.8 15.7
RG213 1.7 2.8 4.6 5.8 9.7 17
Ecoflex 10 ! ! ! ! ! !
Westflex 103* 1 1.5 2.5 3 5 9
450 Ohm Twin 0.28 0.47 0.8 1.03





With an SWR of 6:1 at antenna
Losses in dB per 100 metres at various frequencies
Cable Type: 3.5 MHz 10 MHz 30 MHz 50 MHz 144 MHz 432 MHz
RG58 4.9 7.1 10.7 13.1 20.9 36.1
RG8 Mini / RG8-X 3.7 5.5 8.3 10.1 16.4 29.5
RG8 2.5 3.8 5.8 7 10.7 17.5
RG213 2.8 4.2 6.3 7.6 11.5 19
Ecoflex 10 ! ! ! ! ! !
Westflex 103* 1.6 2.2 3.2 4 6 10
450 Ohm Twin 0.49 0.82 1.37 1.73





With an SWR of 9:1 at the antenna
Losses in dB per 100 metres at various frequencies
Cable Type: 3.5 MHz 10 MHz 30 MHz 50 MHz 144 MHz 432 MHz
RG58 6 8.4 12.1 14.5 22 37.5
RG8 Mini / RG8-X 4.7 6.6 9.6 11.5 17.1 30.1
RG8 3.3 4.9 7 8.3 11.9 18.9
RG213 3.6 5.2 7.5 8.8 12.8 20.4
Ecoflex 10 ! ! ! ! ! !
Westflex 103* 2 2.6 3.8 4.5 6.5 10.5
450 Ohm Twin 0.71 1.16 1.88 2.34



Losses are given a dB per 100 metres. For other lengths divide dB loss figure by 100 and multiply by the actual length in metres.

These loss figures are for the cable only without connectors and do not take into account termination and other losses.


ECOFLEX 10

 ! = I do not have full data for the ECOFLEX 10, but it is included here due to its attractive physical properties: The big plus for these cables is they are extremely flexible - whereas W-103 is easy to damage with repeated movement such as with a rotator or /p use with portable masts etc, Ecoflex 10, it is claimed, should be much more resilient and therefore long lasting due to its flexibility.  More information from  http://www.diodecomms.co.uk
Download the Ecoflex Product Brochure in PDF format here 

Hi Mike,
You responded to my request for info about attenuation at hf of lightweight 75ohm twin, which was kind of you. No one seemed to have the info I wanted so I bought a 100m drum of the stuff from Waters & Stanton.

Using my usual experimental methods (simple and brutal are good descriptors here) I obtained ball park figures for attenuation at 3.56, 7.03, 14.06 and 28.06 MHz.

I set my rig to TX 5w. I then whacked said 5w down a short coax to a nice cross needle SWR meter and thence into a dummy load for the above mentioned frequencies. The meter declared 5w out, nothing measurable back. That convinced me that the meter was ok to use in this application.

Using two BNC to binding post adapters I placed the 100m of 75 ohm twin between rig and meter and measured the received RF power at the far end for the four frequencies above. The rig's SWR indicated the SWR of the entire shooting match was within tolerable limits on each test.

Then I did my sums and the results are below, rounded to one decimal place in honour of my rotten experimental technique.

Attenuation 100m lightweight 75 ohm twin @ hf

3.56MHz -3.4dB
7.03MHz -5.5dB
14.06MHz -7dB
28.06MHz -17dB

Even info derived in this brutally simple way may be useful one day, so here it is, for what it's worth. It appears that this twin is less lossy than RG174 until 28MHz so it may have some QRP application. Or not, as the case may be.

Kindest regards, Vic   (September 2013)


Information compiled from various sources. References:

http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm

http://www.timesmicrowave.com/cgi-bin/calculate.pl

http://www.kc7hxc.us

http://whwestlake.110mb.com/

http://www.diodecomms.co.uk

Coaxial Loss Calculator and Power Compensator : A Microsoft Excel based calculator which is a valuable tool to simply and quickly calculate coax lengths and losses. You can download Coaxial Length Calculator for free but you will need Microsoft Excel to use it or another spreadsheet program capable of using Excel. By Steve Burrows M5BXB  -  http://www.m5bxb.com/coaxlengthcalc.htm

RG58 CQ125; RG8X Belden 9258; RG8 Belden 8237; RG213 Belden 8267
* Westflex103 unconfirmed estimated loss at higher SWR's





TRIMMING AERIALS

Antenna Trimming Chart

This following information below could be very useful indeed when constructing aerials and is compiled by DX Zone / Radio Works from the web page at: http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=13444


Use this chart as an aid in trimming the length of your antenna. It gives you an idea of the change in wire length needed to move antenna resonance a specific number of KHz.

    * Dimensions are for each leg of a half-wave dipole
    * For quarter-wave antennas (i.e. verticals ) use the dimensions directly from this chart
    * Full-wavelength antennas (loops) - multiply the chart dimensions by four (4) and change the overall length of the antenna by that amount.

Lengths are estimates. Many factors will affect their exact value.


To move

80/75 m

40 m

20 m

15 m

10 m

-500 kHz

+8' 4"

+2'

+8"

+3"

+1.5"

-400 kHz

+6' 8"

+1' 9"

+6.5"

+2.5"

+1.25'

-300 kHz

+5'

+1' 4"

+5"

+1.75"

+1"

-200 kHz

+3' 4"

+10"

+3.25"

+1.25

+5/8"

-100 kHz

+1' 7"

+5"

+1.5"

+1/2"

+3/8

0 kHz

0

0

0

0

0

+100 kHz

-1' 7"

-5"

-1.5"

-1/2"

-3/8"

+200 kHz

-3' 4"

-10"

-3.25"

-1.25

-5/8"

+300 kHz

-5'

-1' 4"

-5"

-1.75"

-1"

+400 kHz

-6' 8"

-1' 9"

-6.5"

-2.5"

-1.25'

+500 kHz

-8' 4"

-2'

-8"

-3"

-1.5"

Example:

You have measured the SWR of your 40 meter dipole at various frequencies across the band. You have determined that the SWR is lowest at 7.00 MHz. You actually want the lowest SWR to occur up in the sideband portion of the band, so you need to move resonance up in frequency about 200 KHz.

According to the chart, to move +200 KHz on 40 meters, you will have to shorten each leg of the dipole 10" (-10"). The overall length of the antenna is shortened a total of 20 inches.

Lengthening or shortening the antenna is done at the end insulators. To shorten the antenna, unwind the antenna wire as it wraps around itself at the end insulator. Move the insulator several inches toward the center of the antenna. Re wrap the antenna wire to secure the end insulator. Do not cut the wire. Wrap it back around the antenna wire. You may need to increase the antenna later.    [From
Radio Works / DXZone]





MODES or TYPES OF TRANSMISSIONS / EMISSIONS

The type of emission is often expressed as a three digit code in a format set by the I.T.U; for example J3E identifies the type of emission as amplitude modulation telephony, single sideband, with suppressed carrier - i.e. the familiar Single Side Band Speech transmission while F3E indicates frequency modulation telephony e.g. the familiar NBFM voice and A3E would be double side band amplitude modulated telephony i.e. the typical AM speech transmission.

Some of the frequently encountered meanings for each of the three digits are shown in the tables below. The modes highlighted in red are perhaps the most regularly encountered types on the amateur bands:

N
Unmodulated carrier
A
Double-sideband amplitude modulation (AM)
J
Single-sideband using suppressed carrier (Typical amateur SSB)
R
Single-sideband with reduced or variable carrier
H
Single-sideband with full carrier
F
Frequency Modulation (Typical amateur NBFM)
G
Phase Modulation
C
Television, using amplitude modulation with vestigal sideband
K
Pulse amplitude modulation
L
Pulse width modulation

0
No modulating signal
1
One channel containing digital information, no subcarrier
2
One channel containing digital information, using a subcarrier
3
One channel containing analogue information
7
More than one channel containing digital information
8
More than one channel containing analogue information
(e.g. band 2 v.h.f. stereo broadcasts)
9
Combination of analogue and digital channels

N
No transmitted information
A
Aural telegraphy such as Morse Code - i.e.decoded by ear
B
Electronic telegraphy e.g. RTTY & digital modes decoded by machine
C
Fax transmission
D
Telemetry e.g. data collection or Telecommand e.g. remote control
E
Telephony (voice and sounds)
F
Video (television)
                                        Information compiled by M0MTJ


Below is a listing of all the various ways radio and TV signals are broadcast :

A1A -telegraphy (on - off keying) without modulation by an audio frequency.
A1B -amplitude modulation telegraphy with automatic reception, without using a modulating subcarrier.
A1D -amplitude modulation data transmission, double sideband, without using a modulating subcarrier.
A2A -on-off keying telegraphy using one or several modulating audio frequencies, or on-off keying telegraphy of an amplitude modulated emission.

A2B -amplitude modulation telegraphy with automatic reception and using on-off keying of the modulating subcarrier.
A2D -amplitude modulation data transmission, double sideband and using a modulating subcarrier.
A3C -amplitude modulation facsimile; the main carrier is modulated either directly or by a frequency modulated subcarrier.

A3E -amplitude modulation telephony, double sideband.
C3F -television, in amplitude modulation, with vestigial sideband.
F1A -telegraphy (keyed by frequency variation).
F1B -frequency modulation telegraphy with automatic reception, without using a modulating subcarrier.
F1D -frequency modulation data transmission, double sideband, without using a modulating subcarrier.
F2A -on-off keying telegraphy of an audio frequency for frequency modulation, or by on-off keying of a frequency modulated emission (special case: unkeyed frequency modulated emission).

F2B -frequency modulation telegraphy with automatic reception and using on-off keying of the modulating subcarrier.
F2D -frequency modulation data transmission, using a modulating subcarrier.
F3C -modulation frequency facsimile, by direct modulation of carrier frequency.
F3E -frequency modulation telephony.
F3F -television with frequency modulation.
G1D -phase modulation data transmission, without using a modulating subcarrier.
G2D -phase modulation data transmission, using a modulating subcarrier.
G3C -phase modulation facsimile.
G3E -phase modulation telephony.
G3F -television in phase modulation.
J1D -amplitude modulation data transmission, single sideband, suppressed carrier, using a modulating subcarrier.
J2A -on-off keying telegraphy using one or several modulating audio frequencies, or an on-off keying telegraphy, single sideband, with suppressed carrier.

J2D -amplitude modulation data transmission, single sideband, suppressed carrier without using a modulating subcarrier.

J3C -amplitude modulation facsimile; single sideband, with suppressed carrier.
J3E -amplitude modulation telephony, single sideband, with suppressed carrier.
J8E -amplitude modulation telephony, independent sidebands.
K1A -on-off keying telegraphy of a carrier transmitted by pulses, without modulation by an audio frequency.
K2A -on-off keying telegraphy of one or several audio modulating frequencies, or by on-off keying of a modulated carrier transmitted by pulses (special case: unkeyed modulated carrier transmitted by pulses).

K3E -pulse modulation telephony.
R3C -amplitude modulation facsimile; single sideband, with vestigial carrier.
R3D -amplitude modulation data transmission, single sideband, with vestigial carrier.
R3E -amplitude modulation telephony, single sideband, with vestigial carrier.

The source of the above Modes information is AMANDX, Manitoba, Canada
http://www.angelfire.com/mb/amandx/index.html









RESISTOR COLOUR CODE CHART & CAPACITOR INFORMATION

Please visit my separate page for RESISTOR COLOUR CODES & CAPACITOR INFORMATION Here>





RADIO ETIQUETTE

Good Amateur Radio Etiquette:  Operating Procedures and Amateur Radio Ethics (RSGB pdf download)



GOOD AMATEUR RADIO OPERATING PRACTICES

Good Amateur Radio
                   Operating Practices
Showing Consideration For Others
Remember that radio contacts are not private the amateur radio. community is a public place.
Use language that is clear and will not offend.
Leave music to the broadcast stations.
Keep a copy of the band plans to hand and follow them.
Use amateur codes and abbreviations on amateur bands when they are appropriate (e.g. Two
RSGB Good
                                        Operating Practices
Echo Zero, QSY. 73. 588) and avoid codes or jargon from other radio users (e.g. CB, PMR, military, marine)

Phonetic Alphabet

Keep overs short as you would in a
conversation new friends might want to ioin in or conditions might change such that your signals fade away.
lf you find another station on your'
frequency politely ask them to move, or move your QSO to a clear frequency - propagation may have changed and they may have been there all the time.
Find a clearfrequency to tune up on and keep a note of your ATU settings for quick retuning next time you use the band.
Answer CQ calls once then listen; only call again if no other station has been identified - be patient.
  lf the station you are calling is not working anyone near you wait a while and try again later - be patient.
Try calling CQ on bands that sound dead - others may be waiting for a call.
  Remember, there is no need for CQ on a repeater just M6XYZ listening through GB3UB is enough.

Helping Others
Keep the hobby growing and help
 newcomers to get started.
Good operating practices
Offer friendly advice to help others
 improve their skills.
If you can hear someone calling CQ and no one is answering, give them a call, even if it is just to let them know their signals are getting out.
Always give accurate signal reports if you need 3 repeats, they cannot be 5&9.
Inspire others to be good operators by being one yourself.
If someone needs help (e.g. with putting up an antenna) lend a hand - you may need help next time!
Good operating
                                          practices

Being Active
Use the bands without abusing the
 privileges that your Licence gives you.
Join in club activities (local, national or both) they provide an excellent opportunity to help others and to learn more about the hobby.
Reduce power to minimum whilst
tuning - it's safer for your radio and less interference to others.

Calling Other Stations
Listen carefully to the CQ call is it a general call to all or a specific call to one continent or country?
Only call if the CQ is general or for your area (e.g. CQ UK or 'CQ Europe') or your callsign group (e.g.calls with zero only') your turn will come - be patient.
Always give your callsign in full and remember to send the other stations call first (e.g. 'Delta Six Eight Charlie from Golf Echo Alpha Bravo Charlie)

Learning More
Familiarise yourself with your own radio equipment (e.g. Know how to work split)

Read through the whole of your Licence - the training doesnt cover all of it but you must comply with the parts that apply to you.

Read up on topics of interest (the RSGB operating manual is a mine of information).

Try new ways of operating e.g. back- packing, data modes, satellites, gaining awards, taking part in contests.
Experiment with different antennas  bands, modes learn by doing.

If you dont know something, try to find the answer, search the web, read some books or ask for help.

Set yourself some goals e.g. To upgrade your licence by the end of the year, to work 100 countries in a year / month / weekend, to learn Morse and get a proficiency certificate.


Download this RSGB Leaflet here:     http://www.rsgb.org/tutors/pdf/good_operating_practices.pdf

Join the RSGB - The Radio Society of Great Britain  -  http://www.rsgb.org/

Get A Licence  -  http://www.rsgb.org/getlicence/

Operating Procedures and Amateur Radio Ethics (IARU / RSGB pdf download)


Get Your
                                    Amateur Radio Licence!


THE RADIO AMATEUR IS         

CONSIDERATE... never knowingly operates in such a way as to lessen the pleasure of others.         

LOYAL... offers loyalty, encouragement and support to other amateurs, local clubs and the American Radio Relay League, through which Amateur Radio in the United States is represented nationally and internationally.         

PROGRESSIVE... with knowledge abreast of science, a well-built and efficient station and operation above reproach.         

FRIENDLY... slow and patient operating when requested; friendly advice and counsel to the beginner; kindly assistance, cooperation and consideration for the interests of others. These are the hallmarks of the amateur spirit.         

BALANCED... radio is an avocation, never interfering with duties owed to family, job, school, or community.  

PATRIOTIC... station and skill always ready for service to country and community.

By Paul M. Segal W9EEA (1928)




THE DX CODE OF CONDUCT    http://dx-code.org

I will listen and listen, and then listen again before calling.

I will only call if I can copy the DX station properly.

I will not trust the DX cluster and will be sure of the DX station's call sign before calling.

I will not interfere with the DX station nor anyone calling and will never tune up on the DX frequency or in the QSX slot.

I will wait for the DX station to end a contact before I call.

I will always send my full call sign.

I will call and then listen for a reasonable interval. I will not call continuously.

I will not transmit when the DX operator calls another call sign, not mine.

I will not transmit when the DX operator queries a call sign not like mine.

I will not transmit when the DX station requests geographic areas other than mine.

When the DX operator calls me, I will not repeat my call sign unless I think he has copied it incorrectly.

I will be thankful if and when I do make a contact.

I will respect my fellow hams and conduct myself so as to earn their respect.



CALLING CQ:

e.g. your call sign is CD456

1. Find a clear frequency. If not sure whether the frequency is clear, ask before proceeding.

2.Call "CQ CQ CQ. This is Charlie Delta Four Five Six calling CQ CQ CQ.  Charlie Delta Four Five Six, CD456 calling CQ and waiting for any call."

Listen for any return call.

3. You hear "
Charlie Delta Four Five Six this is Echo Foxtrot Seven Eight Nine, EF789 calling."

4. You respond by saying "
Echo Foxtrot Seven Eight Nine this is Charlie Delta Four Five Six.  Thank you for the call your signal is 59 (give accurate signal report using the RST system). My name is [your name] and my QTH is [your location]. How do you copy my signals? EF789 this is CD456 over."

5. Engage in conversation about other topics (location, weather, type of radio and antenna etc) -
Find ways to get to know each other rather than simply exchanging signal reports and 73s!

6. End an HF contact by giving both call signs and signing off. For example: "... thank you Jim for the contact and 73 to you and your family.  EF789 this is CD456 signing off and clear."
(Adapted from HamSphere text.  -  Hamsphere is an internet system that allows two way communication over telephone lines (Voice Over Internet Protocol / VOIP) - it has nothing whatever to do with RADIO communication because there are no actual radio transmissions made. However, for prospective Radio Amateurs, complete beginners and 'microphone shy' individuals it can give a taste of Radio Procedure and Etiquette).


Amateur radio etiquette:


* Do not transmit before first checking that the frequency is clear.

* If more than one station responds to your call and you can hear one call clearly then simply respond to that station as described.

* If only parts of the call sign is heard (e.g Foxtrot Whiskey or what ever) then in step it may be wise to respond by saying
"the station with the Foxtrot Whiskey call sign please make your call." When the complete call sign is established the QSO can continue.

* Be polite at all times rand promote friendship.  If not, avoid transmitting.

* Set a good example especially for short wave listeners who may be thinking about becoming an amateur.

* Be a good listener- make some brief nots to keep track of topics / subjects etc.

* Always reply to CQ calls if possible, and call CQ yourself.  It helps keeps amateur radio alive.

* Speak clearly and slowly, especially when giving your call sign to someone you have never worked before.

* Try to keep track of everyone in the QSO.  Hopefully someone has assumed the role of "traffic director" to make sure everyone has a chance to contribute to the discussion.  If not, don't hesitate to do it yourself.

* Make it clear at the end of each transmission which station is expected to transmit next.

* Operate on frequencies that are in whole KHz (e.g. 14.325 Khz). This alleviates ambiguity and makes it easier for everyone to be on the same frequency.

* Allow  enough separation between between your transmission and other transmissions so as not to cause adjacent channel interference. e.g. 3 kHz.
(Adapted from HamSphere text.  -  Hamsphere is an internet system that allows two way communication over telephone lines (Voice Over Internet Protocol / VOIP) - it has nothing whatever to do with RADIO communication because there are no actual radio transmissions made. However, for prospective Radio Amateurs, complete beginners and 'microphone shy' individuals it can give a taste of Radio Procedure and Etiquette).






British / Imperial Standard Wire Gauges  - S.W.G  converted to diameter in millimetres and inches

Standard Wire Gauge - British / Imperial - converted to diameter:

Wire Gauge
S.W.G.
Diameter in
Millimeters
Diameter in
Inches
0 8.23
0.324
1 7.62
0.300
2 7.01
0.276
3 6.4
0.252
4 5.89
0.232
5 5.38
0.212
6 4.88
0.182
7 4.47
0.176
8 4.06
0.160
9 3.66
0.144
10 3.25
0.128
11 2.95
0.116
12 2,64
0.104
13 2.34
0.092
14 2.03
0.080
15 1.83
0.072
16 1.63
0.064
17 1.42
0.056
18 1.22
0.048
19 1.02
0.040
20 0.914
0.036
21 0.812
0.032
22 0.711
0.028
23 0.609
0.024
24 0.558
0.022
25 0.508
0.020
26 0.457
0.018
27 0.416
0.0164
28 0.375
0.0148
29 0.345
0.0136
30 0.314
0.0124
31 0.294
0.0116
32 0.274
0.0108
33 0.254
0.0100
34 0.233
0.0092
35 0.213
0.0084
36 0.193
0.0076
37 0.172
0.0068
38 0.152
0.0060
39 0.132
0.0052
40 0.121
0.0048
41 0.111
0.0044
42 0.101
0.0040
43 0.091
0.0036
44 0.081
0.0032
45 0.071
0.0028
46 0.060
0.0024
47 0.050
0.002
48 0.040
0.0016
Information compiled by M0MTJ





American Wire Gauges  - A.W.G. converted to diameter in millimetres and inches

American Wire Gauge - converted to diameter:

American Wire Gauge
A.W.G.

 Diameter in
Millimeters

 Diameter in
Inches

0000 (4/0)

11.684

0.4600

000 (3/0)

10.404

0.4096

00 (2/0)

9.266

0.3648

0 (1/0)

8.252

0.3249

1

7.348

0.2893

2

6.544

0.2576

3

5.827

0.2294

4

5.189

0.2043

5

4.621

0.1819

6

4.115

0.1620

7

3.665

0.1443

8

3.264

0.1285

9

2.906

0.1144

10

2.588

0.1019

11

2.305

0.0907

12

2.053

0.0808

13

1.828

0.0720

14

1.628

0.0641

15

1.450

0.0571

16

1.291

0.0508

17

1.150

0.0453

18

1.024

0.0403

19

0.912

0.0359

20

0.812

0.0320

21

0.723

0.0285

22

0.644

0.0253

23

0.573

0.0226

24

0.511

0.0201

25

0.455

0.0179

26

0.405

0.0159

27

0.361

0.0142

28

0.321

0.0126

29

0.286

0.0113

30

0.255

0.0100

31

0.227

0.00893

32

0.202

0.00795

33

0.180

0.00708

34

0.160

0.00630

35

0.143

0.00561

36

0.127

0.00500

37

0.113

0.00445

38

0.101

0.00397

39

0.0897

0.00353

40

0.0799

0.00314


UK Source for Silver Plated PTFE (Teflon) covered wire for winding higher power baluns:
http://wires.co.uk/acatalog/ptfe_covered.html
14awg / 16 swg or 0.16 mm dia wire
12awg / 14swg 0.2mm dia wire and larger toroid for higher powers.





Toroid Dimensions - typical physical dimensions of iron poweder toroidal cores


Core. OD
(in)
ID
(in)
HGT
(in)
Mean lgth.
(cm)
Cross
sect.
(cm2)
T12 .125 .062 .050 .75 .010
T16 .160 .078 .060 .95 .016
T20 .200 .088 .070 1.15 .025
T25 .250 .120 .096 1.50 .042
T30 .307 .151 .128 1.83 .065
T37 .375 .205 .128 2.32 .070
T44 .440 .229 .159 2.67 .107
T50 .500 .300 .190 3.20 .121
T68 .690 .370 .190 4.24 .196
T80 .795 .495 .250 5.15 .242
T94 .942 .560 .312 6.00 .385
T106 1.060 .570 .437 6.50 .690


Core OD (in) ID
(in)
HGT
(in)
Mean lgth.
(cm)
Cross
sect.
(cm2)
T130 1.30 .78 .437 8.29 .73
T157 1.57 .95 .570 10.05 1.14
T184 1.84 .95 .710 11.12 2.04
T200 2.00 1.25 .550 12.97 1.33
T200A 2.00 1.25 1.000 12.97 2.42
T225 2.25 1.40 .550 14.56 1.50
T225A 2.25 1.40 1.000 14.56 2.73
T300 3.00 1.92 .500 19.83 1.81
T300A 3.00 1.92 1.000 19.83 3.58
T400 4.00 2.25 .650 24.93 3.66
T400A 4.00 2.25 1.000 24.93 7.43
T500 5.20 3.08 .800 33.16 5.46

information from:  http://www.bytemark.com

Balun using  T200-2 toroid (17 turns of e.c.w.) or T200A-2 toroid (13 turns of e.c.w.) for 400 watt H.F. Balun.
T400-2 Toroid (14 turns of e.c.w.) for 1000 watt H.F. Balun.




KENWOOD TS-590S Transceiver Resources

Kenwood TS-590S Product Page

Kenwood TS-590S Brochure


Richard G3XVF has sent some useful and informative links: "Ian, G3NRW, has a website all the links and information
about the TS590s,  he also has a website about the TS990s":

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/wadei/ts-590s.htm

TS-590S Resource Pages by Ian Wade G3NRW
    - Detailed instructions on How To Set Up SSB Audio on the TS-590s for best TX performance


Richard G3XVF also notes: "The following links may also help":

EHam TS590S Reviews: http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/9266

http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TS-590/info

http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/KenwoodTS-590/info

"Hope the above is of some help. 73 de Richard  G3XVF"  Thanks Richard !

Kenwood Download and Update Centre

User Manual:

TS-590S User Manual (Kenwood.eu) or TS-590S User Manual (Kenwood.com)
                                                                                                      alternative download TS-590S_manual.pdf


Advanced Instructions:


TS-590S IN-DEPTH MANUAL (Kenwood.eu)  or  TS-590S IN-DEPTH MANUAL (Kenwood.com)

TS-590S Network Command Manual (Kenwood.eu)

TS-590S USB Audio Settings (Kenwood.eu)

PC CONTROL COMMAND REFERENCE FOR TEH TS-590S (Kenwood.eu)
PC CONTROL COMMAND REFERENCE FOR THE TS-590S (Kenwood.com)



Firmware & Software:

Firmware Updating Program TS-590

Radio Control Program ARCP-590

Virtual COM Port Driver

USB Audio Controller ARUA-10

KENWOOD NETWORK COMMAND SYSTEM
Radio Host Program ARHP-590
Radio VoIP Program ARVP-10






WINDOWS  ALT Codes

Alt + 0153..... ... trademark symbol
Alt + 0169.... .... copyright symbol
Alt + 0174..... ....registered trademark symbol
Alt + 0176 .........degree symbol
Alt + 0177 .......plus-or -minus sign
Alt + 0182 ........paragraph mark
Alt + 0190 .......fraction, three-fourths
Alt + 0215 .........multiplication sign
Alt + 0162.......the cent sign
Alt + 0161.......... .upside down exclamation point
Alt + 0191.......... upside down question mark
Alt + 1.......☺....smiley face
Alt + 2 ......☻.....black smiley face
Alt + 15.....☼.....sun
Alt + 12......♀.....female sign
Alt + 11.....♂......male sign
Alt + 6.......♠.....spade
Alt + 5.......♣...... Club
Alt + 3.......♥...... Heart
Alt + 4.......♦...... Diamond
Alt + 13......♪.....eighth note
Alt + 14......♫...... beamed eighth note
Alt + 8721.... ∑.... N-ary summation (auto sum)
Alt + 251.....√.....square root check mark
Alt + 8236.....∞..... infinity
Alt + 24.......↑..... up arrow
Alt + 25......↓...... down arrow
Alt + 26.....→.....rght arrow
Alt + 27......←.....left arrow
Alt + 18.....↕......up/down arrow
Alt + 29......↔...left right arrow


CTRL Key combinations

CTRL + ALT + $ =    Euro symbol
CTRL+C: Copy
CTRL+X: Cut
CTRL+V: Paste
CTRL+Z: Undo
CTRL+B: Bold
CTRL+U: Underline
CTRL+I: Italic

More Keyboard Shortcuts for Windows at:  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/126449



Icom amateur radio
 






Mike Smith - MDS975.co.uk 2003 - 2016





M0MTJ
Subjects covered on this page:
Amateur Radio; Ham Radio; Radio; Transceivers; HF; VHF; UHF; Data Modes; Morse Code; RTTY; PSK31; SSTV; FSTV; Amtor; Sitor
Antennas; Aerials; Cable; Coaxial Cable; Twin Lead; Masts; Poles; Propagation; Computer; PC; USB Computer Interface; Microphone
Loudspeaker; Filters; Noise Reduction; DSP; Digital Signal Processing; Morse Key; SWR ; Inverted L; Inverted V; Dipole; Doublet;




BRMB Radio Birmingham